Vintage local wine writing pulled
from the Local Winos cellar

Category: "101"

A brief history of Colorado wine and a vintage 1998 Cabernet Franc

For a dash of Colorado wine history, it takes little more than a trip to Doug Caskey’s cellar (which should be noted is an actual dirt floor, back bending cellar) in Boulder.

read more

The top (well, most common) grapes of Texas

Every good wine growing region in the world has figured out which grapes it grows best, and which to let alone. Given the diversity of grape plantings in Texas, we’re clearly in the figuring phase. New wineries are appearing, drinkers’ tastes are changing and producers are getting better senses of which grapes will succeed on their land.

read more

The importance of Texas AVAs

The selection of grape varietals planted in Texas vineyards is in flux. That’s to be expected in a relatively young and growing wine market: there are many new wineries deciding for the first time what grapes to grow, and many figuring out which grapes their land treats best.

read more

Wine terms: The Other 46

There are the haves and the haves nots in the U.S. wine industry. It turns out fermented grape juice is just like every sector of the business world. The difference being how geographically isolated the haves are. If you make wine in California, Oregon, Washington or New York, you are a have. This means your [...]

read more

The basics of American Viticulture Areas

While most stateside wine labeling rules are meant to clarify, and not necessarily define quality, the American Viticulture Area hierarchy is the closest thing to quality notation you’ll find. The basic premise being that if the grapes come from a small, defined area (one vineyard or registered AVA) it will be of higher quality than the [...]

read more

Wine terms: Locapour

Foodies have their cool term for eating local (locavore, the 2007 word of the year, according to Oxford), meaning winos deserve one too. Recently, the word locapour has started to gain some traction. The general meaning being you drink the vino of the region (set a radius that makes sense for you). The idea being [...]

read more

Wine tasting terms: Tannic

It’s the astringent, sometimes bitter, feeling of wine when every bit of moisture is sucked out. Air and aging can changes this profile greatly, which is why tannins are considered by many to be a good attribute to have in a bold red. As a big, tannic red ages, the tannins will combine with proteins [...]

read more

It’s a mead thing: A primer to Colorado honey wine

Mead is wine. And it isn’t. By technical definition, it fits into the vino category (as in its fermented sugar), and the state’s growing number of meaderies fall under the control of the Colorado Wine Industry Development Board.

read more

The basics of New Mexico’s AVAs

American Viticulture Areas are the most finite geographic designations U.S. wine labels showcase outside of the actual town a vineyard is located. Regulated by government, AVAs are simply an area classification system based on geographic lines and are not a statement of quality.

read more